Human Rights Awareness Week 2017

HUMAN RIGHTS AWARENESS WEEK

This yearly event focuses on global and national human rights issues, which sits at the center of a Cascadia education. The 2017 Human Rights Awareness Week events are intended to foster critical thinking about human rights in the context of human migration and immigration, and how those rights of people at the local, national and global levels are impacted.  Students, staff, faculty, and the community are encouraged to attend any and all of the events listed.

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
Click on links below for more detailed information.
 

Monday, Feb. 6

Border Doors: Unmasking the Zones of Meaning (moved to Wednesday, Feb. 8)

Slavery in the Contemporary United States (cancelled)

People on the Move (moved to Wednesday, Feb. 8)


 

Tuesday, Feb. 7

The Path We Share: Migration and Human Rights

Amnesty and Equality: Do Undocumented Residents Have a Right to Remain?

Community Reception : Border Doors


  Wednesday, Feb. 8  

Film and Discussion: Maid in America

Who Is Doing Our Dirty Work? Domestic Labor in the United States


  Thursday, Feb. 9

Film and Discussion: A Revolution in Four Seasons

Border Doors: Stories behind the Doors


All events are located in Mobius Hall at Cascadia College.



Monday, Feb. 6

1:30pm-3:20pm

Cancelled

Slavery in the Contemporary United States
Ms. Tanya Fernandez
Education Director of Seattle Against Slavery

A workshop on how global and local issues contribute to the existence of human trafficking and affect those who seek work, asylum, or a home in the United States.


Tanya Fernandez has been working on issues related to human trafficking for the past 5 years. She has provided support and case management for commercially sexually exploited youth and victims of sexual violence. Currently she oversees the implementation of a human trafficking prevention program for high school students.

http://www.seattleagainstslavery.org/


3:30pm-5:00pm

To be rescheduled

People on the Move
Ms. Ailish Collins
Student Activist Coordinator, Amnesty International

In this workshop, participants will learn about the human rights granted to migrants, refugees, and asylum seekers around the world. They will discuss both domestic and international human rights abuses, and discover what they, as individuals, can do to help and protect people on the move.


Ailish Collins is a student and activist here in Bothell, WA. She has worked with Amnesty International for the past five years, helping to coordinate student groups all over Washington state and the western region. She has successfully worked on campaigns to end child marriage, free prisoners of conscience, and end torture.



Tuesday, Feb. 7

11:00am-1:05pm The Path We Share: Migration and Human Rights
Mr. David Fenner
Member of Speakers Bureau, Humanities Washington 

Examine the roots and the routes of human migration from our beginnings in Africa and trace our oft-branching journey into the 21st century. This talk explores the push and pull factors that cause human migration, helping us to better know the mosaic of peoples who have settled in the Pacific North.


David Fenner is an affiliate faculty member at the Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington.  He is also the lead presenter for the federally-funded Bridging Cultures program, a series of professional development workshops for K-12 teachers in districts with large immigrant populations.  He was the founding director of the World Learning Center in Muscat, Oman and from 2000 to 2007 served as the Assistant Vice-Provost for International Education at the UW.


1:30pm-3:20pm Amnesty and Equality: Do Undocumented Residents Have a Right to Remain?
Dr. Michael Blake
Faculty, Philosophy, Public Policy, and Governance, University of Washington

This presentation examines the belief that long-standing residents of a community have the right to remain in that community – whether or not they had the right to enter it in the first place. Michael Blake will interrogate the claim of Joseph Carens, for whom justice demands that the undocumented be given a pathway towards permanent residency and citizenship. Blake argues that a more promising basis for the right to amnesty derives not from justice, but from moral virtue.


Until 2016, Michael Blake was the Director of the UW's Program on Values in Society. He received a PhD from Stanford University and is jointly appointed to the Department of Philosophy and to the Daniel J. Evans School of Public Affairs.

https://phil.washington.edu/people/michael-blake

5:00pm-7:00pm

Community Reception: Border Doors Exhibit

Slam Poet Roberto Carlos Ascalon
Refreshments will be served.

Celebrate the opening of Cascadia Border Doors art exhibit. More than 25 full-scale doors that display stories of immigration. Many of the doors were created by local community groups and individuals. Doors from the original exhibit shown in New Mexico will be included (See Monday, 11:00am-1:05pm). 

For more information, click here



Wednesday, Feb. 8 
 
9:00am-10:50am

Film and Discussion: Maid in America

Dr. Lindsay Custer
Faculty, Sociology, Cascadia College

Dr. Jesús Pérez
Faculty, History, Cascadia College

 Documentary that offers an intimate, eye-opening look at the lives and stories of three Latina immigrants who work as nannies and housekeepers in Los Angeles, California.

Lindsay Custer earned her PhD in Sociology from the University of Michigan. Her doctoral research focused on the negotiation of cross-cultural differences in intercultural marriages between Americans and Japanese. She spent four years teaching and conducting research in Osaka, Japan. Her areas of academic interest include marriage, gender, race/ethnicity, and Japanese culture.

Jesús Pérez received his Ph.D. in Mexican History at the University of California, San Diego. Before Cascadia, he taught at San Diego City College, San Diego State University, and at the University of California, San Diego. His academic interests are in immigration issues, gang culture, Chicano and Latino studies, Mexican history, and the history of soccer in Latin America.

11:00am-1:05pm Border Doors: Unmasking the Zones of Meaning
Exhibit and Panel Discussion:


Dr. Jesús Pérez
Faculty, History, Cascadia College

Mr. Chris Gildow
Faculty, Art, Cascadia College

Mr. Claudio Pérez
Sandia Preparatory School, Albuquerque, NM


http://www.sandiaprep.org/uploaded/PDFs/Homepage
_News/Border-Doors-Exhibit-Catalog.pdf

 

An exhibit of full-scale doors upon which high school students from New Mexico created their personal immigration stories, with the guidance of their instructor, Claudio Pérez. A panel presentation will provide a historical, artistic, and cultural context for the exhibit. The exhibit will be ongoing for the entire week.


Jesús Pérez received his Ph.D. in Mexican History at the University of California, San Diego. Before Cascadia, he taught at San Diego City College, San Diego State University, and at the University of California, San Diego. His academic interests are in immigration issues, gang culture, Chicano and Latino studies, Mexican history, and the history of soccer in Latin America.

Chris Gildow received his MFA from Tufts University and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. He is active in curriculum development, including a Gates Foundation / Washington State Grant to create an Open Course Library textbook for the "Introduction to Art". He received the Excellence in Teaching Award in 2012 from the National Society of Leadership and Success.

Claudio Pérez, creator of the Border Doors Project, is currently a member of the Modern Language Department at Sandia Preparatory School in Albuquerque, NM where he teaches Spanish language, Spanish Cinema and Border Studies, and also serves as faculty sponsor for Spanish Model United Nations.
https://www.sandiaprep.org/academics/learning-beyond-the-classroom

3:30pm-5:00pm

People on the Move
Ms. Ailish Collins
Student Activist Coordinator, Amnesty International

In this workshop, participants will learn about the human rights granted to migrants, refugees, and asylum seekers around the world. They will discuss both domestic and international human rights abuses, and discover what they, as individuals, can do to help and protect people on the move.


Ailish Collins is a student and activist here in Bothell, WA. She has worked with Amnesty International for the past five years, helping to coordinate student groups all over Washington state and the western region. She has successfully worked on campaigns to end child marriage, free prisoners of conscience, and end torture.


1:30pm-3:20pm

Who Is Doing Our Dirty Work? Domestic Labor in the United States

Dr. Kim England
Faculty, Geography, UW

Mr. Robert Beiser
Executive Director of Seattle Against Slavery

Ms. Gilda Blanco
Board of Directors, National Domestic Workers Alliance 
Panelists will explore domestic labor in the United States. They will identify some of the forces that create vulnerabilities for workers who come to the United States and are exploited in trafficking situations. They will also look at how domestic workers are successfully organizing for social change at the local and national level and will encourage us to consider ways that we can get involved

Kim England earned her MA and PhD (both in Geography) from the Ohio State University. She teaches classes on urban geography, the geographies of inequalities and feminist geographies at the University of Washington. Her research spans feminist, economic, social and political geographies, particularly in terms of the relationships between care, paid work and the home, and the interconnections between inequalities, social reproduction and the state.
https://faculty.washington.edu/england/

After several years at Microsoft, Robert Beiser left the tech world to work in the nonprofit sector as a social justice advocate. His role with Seattle Against Slavery began in 2010 as the volunteer Public Awareness Campaigns Manager. He holds a Master's Degree in Public Affairs from UW and travels the country speaking on technology and human trafficking.
Seattle Against Slavery
http://www.seattleagainstslavery.org/

Gilda Blanco was born in the Northern Coast of Guatemala and has lived in Washington State since 2008. As the Household Helper Program Coordinator at Casa Latina, she educates women in the cleaning industry on green cleaning alternatives and promotes health and safety in the workplace. She is currently the Women without Borders organizer responsible for developing domestic worker leaders. 
https://www.domesticworkers.org/


Thursday, Feb. 9
11:00am-1:05pm

Film and Discussion:  A Revolution in Four Seasons
Ms. Jessie Deeter

Producer and Director

In this film, two politically opposed young women fight to shape their lives along with the political future of Tunisia, the sole country to emerge from the Arab Spring uprisings as a functional democracy.


Jessie Deeter is a documentary producer, director and journalist. She has been producing, reporting and shooting documentaries for more than a decade, specializing in work in Africa and the Middle East. From December 2011 through September 2012, she was a Fulbright Scholar in Oman, Morocco and Tunisia, where she began work on A Revolution in Four Seasons. She has a master's degree from UC Berkeley’s journalism program.

http://pulitzercenter.org/people/jessie-deeter


1:30pm-3:20pm

Border Doors: Stories behind the Doors
Open forum with creators of the doors

In this open forum, participants will share their personal experiences and stories behind the doors that they created for the Border Doors project.