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Check out our Learning Communities for Spring Quarter 2017

Learning communities are a mash up of two distinct courses, taught by two fabulous instructors, for double the credits and double the time. Students say learning communities help them to think about subjects in new and more meaningful ways. Cascadia is offering the following two learning communities Spring Quarter 2017.


 

Protest! A History of Culture, Social Messaging, and Change 


Chris Gildow and David Ortiz

In this learning community, students study, create and respond to media systems as expressed in historical struggles and protest. Working individually and collaboratively, they will examine and reflect upon their perspectives on cultural production, narration, and consumption of protest’s forms, content, designs, and narratives- and will produce graphic arts based images that reflect the history of protest movements around the globe, and participate in critical dialogue regarding the content and context of their creative work.  

graphic image for Protest class

Sec LC2    TTh    11:00am-3:45pm   TOTAL 10 credits
Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENGL 090 with a grade of 2.0 or higher or placement into ENGL 096.

Students must register for both courses below for a total of 10.0 credits:

Item 1190    ART 110          2-Dimensional Design 
with
Item 3330    HUMAN 150    Introduction to Cultural Studies 


 

Big Bangs and Little Green Men: Thinking Critically about the Universe and Its Origins


John VanLeer and David Shapiro

This learning community is a course in how to think about weird (and not-so-weird) things; it uses the study of astronomy and related topics as a way to explore what counts as a good reason for believing something to be true. A central theme of the course is the scientific method: how does science proceed in the production of knowledge and how does that method differ from other methods of producing and justifying beliefs? Students can expect to come out of this class with a deeper understanding of astronomy, of what counts as a good reason for believing something to be true, and an improved ability to evaluate arguments, both in science and in their day-to-day lives. (LAB)

graphic image for Big Bangs class

Sec LCH    MW     11:00am-3:20pm    TOTAL 10 credits
Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENGL 090 with a grade of 2.0 or higher or placement by testing into ENGL 096; AND completion of MATH 085 with a grade of 2.0 or higher or placement by testing into MATH 095.

Students must register for both courses below for a total of 10.0 credits:

Item 1300    ASTR& 101    Introduction to Astronomy
with
Item 4000    PHIL& 115     Critical Thinking